Last week we launched the first report from our Victorian connected and automated vehicle (CAV) trials. Some of the report’s more remarkable findings were reported on by the media, such as the odd behaviour exhibited by CAVs as they drove through the CityLink Sound Tube. 

While the Sound Tube remains an on-going mystery to be solved, the report highlighted a number of clearer challenges for vehicles manufacturers, infrastructure providers and regulators to overcome before fully automated cars can safely operate on our roads, including changes to line markings and types and position of speed limit signage.

During the first phase of the two-year trial, 12 partially automated cars travelled nearly 5,000 kilometres along sections of the Monash-CityLink-Tullamarine corridor, examining how the vehicles interacted with the motorway environment.

While the trial has identified a number of challenges for vehicle manufacturers, infrastructure providers and regulators to overcome before fully automated cars can safely operate on our roads, changes to line markings and types and position of speed limit signage will be a step in the right direction.

The trial also included a community research program which investigated community awareness and attitudes towards automated vehicles.

The research found that there was a need to educate drivers about the limitations of vehicles with partial automation features on the road today to ensure drivers of these vehicles do not overestimate their capabilities while the technology is evolving.

For more information on the research findings and recommendations check out cavs.transurban.com

 

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